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Chant Name:
Click to hear the pronunciation
E Manono (O Manono)

First Line :
Click to hear the pronunciation
E Manono lä `ea

Content Categories :
Ali`i (chiefs, chiefesses)
Aloha (love)
Holoholona (animals)
Mo`olelo (legends and myths)
Nä Akua (gods and goddesses)
Nature
Pä`ani (games, pastimes, sport)
Pele `Ohana (volcano goddess and family)
Wahi Pana (legendary places)
Other

Chant Text (Hawaiian): Chant Text (English):
E Manono lä `ea
E Manono lä `ea
`Ae `oe `ae `oe ë
Kau ka `ope`ope
Ka ulu hala lä `ea
`Ae `oe `ae `oe ë
Ka uluhe lä `ea
Ka uluhe lä `ea
`Ae `oe `ae `oe ë
Häli`i pünana
No huli mai
`Ae `oe `ae `oe ë
Huli mai `oe lä
Moe käua
`Ae `oe `ae `oe ë
E Manono lä `ea
E Manono lä `ea
`Ae `oe `ae `oe ë
Kau ka `ope`ope
Ka ulu hala lä `ea
`Ae `oe `ae `oe ë
Kö aloha lä `ea
Kö aloha lä `ea
`Ae `oe `ae `oe ë
Mälama kö aloha
Mälama kö aloha ë
`Ae `oe `ae `oe ë
Mälama kö aloha

He inoa no Manono
O Manono tra la
O Manono tra la
La la la la
Place the bundles
In the pandanus grove tra la
La la la la
The wild staghorn fern tra la
The wild staghorn fern tra la
La la la la
A nest is spread
Now turn to me
La la la la
Turn to me now
Let us rest
La la la la
O Manono tra la
O Manono tra la
La la la la
Place the bundles
In the pandanus grove tra la
La la la la
Your love tra la
Your love tra la
La la la la
Keep your love
Keep your love
La la la la
Keep your love

In the name of Manono

Source of Chant & Translation:
Nona Beamer Collection

Published Research Sources: 

Unwritten Literature of Hawai`i (Emerson)
- Chapter XXV "The Hula Pa`i-Umauma" references this chant. Additional lines are shown - consult book for detail and translation. It is listed as Hula Pa`i Umauma (chest-smiting hula) and Hula Palani (French hula). Emerson explains French connection.

Nä Mele Hula volume 2 (Beamer)
- Page 46 documents Nona Beamer's family connection to the Chiefess whom this chant is written for and gives extensive detail on the events surrounding Manono's death alongside her husband Kekuaokalani.


Additional Notes :
In 1997, the Bishop Museum released a CD entitled "Nä Leo Hawai`i Kahiko: The Master Chanters of Hawai`i; Songs of Old Hawai`i." It contains 48 historic recordings of chants. "E Manono" is Track 25 and is 45 seconds long.

It is chanted by Joseph `Ilälä`ole and is part of the Mader Collection at Bishop Museum. It is listed as a Hula Pa`i Umauma (seated, chest-smiting hula). The complete Hawaiian text and English translation are provided in the liner notes. As is the case with Emerson's "Unwritten Literature," there are additional lines than those listed above from the Beamer Collection. Consult the liner notes directly to study differences.

The CD is distributed by The Mountain Apple Company, P.O. Box 22373, Honolulu, Hawai`i 96823. 1-(800)-882-7088, (808) 597-1888, or www.mountainapplecompany.com.

Background on Chant :
This chant is dedicated to an historic figure in Hawaiian history, Chiefess Manono. She was killed in the Battle of Kuamo`o in 1820. It was a turbulent period in Hawai`i. Kamehameha I died on May 8th of the previous year, and his son Liholiho became Kamehameha II. At that time, the native society was split between keeping the "traditional" societal structure known as the "`Aikapu " or abandoning it. In October 1819, the Kapu system was formally abolished under the leadership of Liholiho and Kamehameha I's favorite wife Ka`ahumanu. Thereafter, the "`Ainoa" was established.

Many Hawaiians still believed in the traditional system and fought to uphold it. Chiefess Manono was married to Kekuaokalani, a cousin of Liholiho. In King David Kaläkaua's book "The Legends and Myths of Hawai`i," he refers to Kekuaokalani as "The Last Great Defender of the Hawaiian Gods" in his chapter entitled "The Destruction of the Temples." A fierce battle in defense of the Kapu system took place in January 1820, led by Kekuaokalani and Manono, and they were defeated by Liholiho and his followers. Their slain bodies and those of their fallen comrades were covered with lava rocks and to this day remain at the Kuamo`o battle/grave site, found at the south end of Ali`i Drive in Kona.

Although much has been written about the time period and the Battle of Kuamo`o, there is not much documentation on this chant. Please see "Published Sources" section above for greater detail on where to find what research is available. Black and white visuals are part of the Hawai`i State Archives Collection.

Please also consult the "Kupuna" section at bottom to read and hear what our elders have to share.

Visuals:
Elderly Kamehameha the First
Kamehameha II, Liholiho, who battled Kekuaokalani and Manono
Ancient Kuamo`o battlesite, 2000
Walkway at Kuamo`o gravesite for visitors to view area
Kuamo`o area, 2000
Coastline in Kuamo`o area


Related Hula Types
Hula Ali`i (Dance for chief or monarch)
Hula Ipu (Dance with hollow gourd)
 

Related Implements/Instruments
Ipu (Gourd)
 

Related Küpuna
Beamer, Nona Kapuailohiamanonokalani Desha
 

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