Ao         1st Century    Migrations      1700's           1800's           1900's               2000                    2001              2002






Hale Pulelehua
To learn more about HPS's rental dance studio, Hale Pulelehua, click here



  

NetEnterprise Inc.




Beamer and Loo perform a Hula `O`opa.
 Click to hear Audio transcript Click to see Video clip
THIS PERFORMANCE CLIP IS PROVIDED FOR RESEARCH PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO SERVE AS AN INSTRUCTIONAL TOOL FOR ONE TO LEARN THE DANCE. PROPER PROTOCOL REQUIRES YOU SPEAK TO THE KUMU TO REQUEST PERMISSION.
Nona Beamer and Maile Loo
Honolulu, 1999
In this clip, Auntie Nona chants as hänai daughter Maile Loo shares a Hula `O`opa (dance as lame person) that she taught her. Chant is "Keawe `O`opa" or "Halehale Kealoha i Ha`ikü E."
Length: 1:39

`Ae, Halehale ke aloha i Ha`ikü e

Halehale ke aloha i Ha`ikü e
Aniani mai ana kona aloha
Ma luna mai a`o `Äwili kü
Ke po`i a ke kai a`o Kapeku
Kai `au`au ka mea aloha
Kona aloha ka walawala
`Oni ana ka Manawa me puhi ala
Huhululu i ka hulu o ka manu
Ka ua pëhia mai i ka pali
Keawe, Keawe, Keawe `O`opa
Ne`ene`e nei ma kahakai
O honua nalu `o Kamaka`eha
"A pae `o Kamaka`eha i ka nalu"
"A pae, a pae"
"A pae `o Kamaka`eha i ka nalu la"
"A pae?"


Beamer describes steps of "Hula `O`opa."
 Click to hear Audio transcript Click to see Video clip
Nona Beamer
Honolulu, 1999
In this clip, Auntie Nona describes the unique steps of "Hula `O`opa."
Length: 3:35

NONA BEAMER: Um, this is uh ... `o`opa. Danced as a crippled person. Story of Keawe, the crippled poet.

MAILE LOO: What can you tell us about um, learning an `o`opa? What do you recall?

NONA BEAMER: Oh, the movement at the end of Keawe. Yeah. That was the `o`opa. And what step is that? That's `o`opa step. Down, touch the knee; down, touch the knee. And not just ... this touch the knee. But this touch the knee. There's a difference.

MAILE LOO: You mean crossing the feet?

NONA BEAMER: Yeah, crossing the feet. And some not even touching. You know. What's the name of that step? You just go down low, and then one where you put the arms on the-the hands on the knee. And then you push yourself up. And one where you just keep the hands on the-on the hips. You don't go down all the way. So maybe there are four variations ... of that `o`opa step. Okay. Hands on hips. Okay. The duck walk uh, with knee touching. Hands on hips. Then with knee touching and hands on knees. And ... duck walk uh, crossed knees. One, two, three, four. Yeah.

MAILE LOO: So which one was used in Halehale? In Keawe `O`opa?

NONA BEAMER: We did the one with the knees touching and the hands on the knees. This one. And it does help you get up. Is that the one we did? And then you can help yourself push up. I think the one with the hands on the hips is harder. But I think the one this way looks more creeping, crawling. And it does-yeah. And I think it gives you a chance to spread the legs a little farther apart. Where if the hands are here, you have to kind of take mincing steps. But with the hands here, you can slide a little more. Gives you more leverage.


  Site Map
Privacy Statment
   
     

Copyright © 2014 Hula Preservation Society, All Rights Reserved
Web Powered by NetEnterprise Inc.