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Beamer performs Hula `Ülili "He Moku Ka`ula".
 Click to hear Audio transcript Click to see Video clip
THIS PERFORMANCE CLIP IS PROVIDED FOR RESEARCH PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO SERVE AS AN INSTRUCTIONAL TOOL FOR ONE TO LEARN THE DANCE. PROPER PROTOCOL REQUIRES YOU SPEAK TO THE KUMU TO REQUEST PERMISSION.
Nona Beamer
Honolulu, 1999
In this clip, Auntie Nona performs "He Moku Ka`ula" as a Hula `Ülili, or dance with spinning gourd rattle. You will hear her chanting in what her grandmother taught her as "Ni`ihau style", where she uses the "t" for "k", and "r" for "l".
Length: 1:19

`Ae, he motu Ta`ura Nihoa me Ni`ihau

He motu Ta`ura Nihoa me Ni`ihau
I ta uru ra`i a Tawaihoa a Täne
`O taurana-a-ta-rä i Haräri`i
Hara ta rä tau ma te tua o Rehua
Tau ta mörehurehu o te ahiahi
Moe e nö Taua`i i runa ta rä

E ö ana `o Rehua i te tai


Beamer describes and demonstrates the `ülili.
 Click to hear Audio transcript Click to see Video clip
Nona Beamer
Honolulu, 1999
In this clip, Auntie Nona shares her knowledge of the`ülili - how it is made, played, and utilized in hula.
Length: 2:42

MAILE LOO: So tell me about your new toy.

NONA BEAMER: Well, this is the `ülili, and it is a toy. [CHUCKLES] Na, na, na, na. We used to think so. And we'd do it like a yo-yo. My grandmother would say, No, no, no; that's not a toy. It's actually three gourds mounted on a stick. And the principle is like a yo-yo. You pull it and it revolves, and then it goes back in again. Uh-huh. It's actually a la`amia. And now I see a lot made of coconut. Which is all right. In the absence of the la`amia, the coconut is better than not having anything. But the coconut sound is dull. The la`amia is very bright. Uh-huh. So if we have a choice, we have them made of la`amia. M-hm.

MAILE LOO: So when did you first use this instrument?

NONA BEAMER: We were twelve. [CHUCKLES] Because I couldn't pull the string. You know, it takes a little strength. And then to guide it back again, you know. And if they're not balanced properly, your hand goes-like that. And it's very hard to hold onto. Uh-huh. So my father made the first ones that we used, and they were spinning very, very easily. Uh-huh. M-hm. But storytelling with it is not uh ... very easy. Because of course, the story takes uh, prominence. So you always have to first consider the story, and then however you're enhancing it is secondary. The message is first-the story, the people, the places. But the manner in which you tell the story is important to add the drama to it, to put the story across. Yeah. And I dare say, without something kind of exciting, you know, sometimes the story falls a little flat. But if you perk it up with something exciting, oh, the children are listening like that. [CHUCKLES]

I think the `ülili is exciting cuz it has a different kind of strength to it and the pulling and the muscle and the,uh, the body has lots of, uh, energy, you know. It's unlike anything else. Mmhm. "He motu Ta`ura Ni`ihoa me." It just, uh, rrrrr, it just, uh, used to excite me so to do that. And then we did, uh, mention that we talked with this lady on Moloka`i that remembered her family doing it without the seeds in the `ülili. And it was just for the sound of the whirring but not with the thrrrrrr of the seeds in it, you know. I thought, well, there's another type of `ülili.


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