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Beamer tells story of learning "Hula Pua`a."
 Click to hear Audio transcript Click to see Video clip
Nona Beamer
Honolulu, 1999
In this clip, Auntie Nona provides a humorous and entertaining account of her childhood experience of learning a "Hula Pua`a."
Length: 2:14

MAILE LOO: So what's your favorite animal?

NONA BEAMER: [LAUGHS]

MAILE LOO: Or I mean, your favorite animal to dance.
[LAUGHS]

NONA BEAMER: For the hula, it's the pua`a. [CHUCKLES]

MAILE LOO: And why is that?

NONA BEAMER: Well, the story was from childhood. One of our homes on Big Island was in Punalu`u on the black sand beach. And lots of wild pigs would be roaming around there. [CHUCKLES] So it was great fun for the kids to pick guava branches and go swat the pigs and chase them out of the village, you know. And there was a pond-it was a freshwater spring, and the women come down and wash their clothes, you know. And of course, a tidal wave came and covered everything. But at that time when we were growing up, the pigs just want to come to drink the water, and the kids used to swat 'em and chase 'em away. So the "Hula Pua`a" was a favorite of mine. But I had never seen one. And uh, Sweetheart Grandma had seen one, and she said what she remembered was the cupping of the hands over the nose. And the announcement "A te." And then telling what the pig was doing-"holo nei i ta pua`a." "A te, inu i ta wai". And then you make all the sounds, you know. [CHUCKLES] Oh, when I was younger, I could scoot around a little more. [LAUGHS] Now, no can scoot.

So she bought a pig. And Grandpa built the little pen. Of course, our house on Hilo was on the banks of the Wailuku River. So this was uh, the pen out by the uh, clothesline, you know. [CHUCKLES] So we're sitting there, we're watching that darn pig. [LAUGHS] And imitating everything he was doing, and trying to get the sound, you know. [SNORTS] Course she could do it... [LAUGHS] It's hilarious. But, that's the type of hula. You imitate what the animal is doing. And she said, at least you don't have to smell it! [LAUGHS] I counted my blessings. [CHUCKLES]

MAILE LOO: And then um, what did you do with your pig after? Did you keep it as a pet?

NONA BEAMER: Oh, no, we ate him. [LAUGHS]


Beamer performs Hula Pua`a or pig dance.
 Click to hear Audio transcript Click to see Video clip
THIS PERFORMANCE CLIP IS PROVIDED FOR RESEARCH PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO SERVE AS AN INSTRUCTIONAL TOOL FOR ONE TO LEARN THE DANCE. PROPER PROTOCOL REQUIRES YOU SPEAK TO THE KUMU TO REQUEST PERMISSION.
Nona Beamer
Honolulu, 1999
In this clip, Auntie Nona performs a Hula Pua`a or pig dance. She learned this hula type and chant from her "Sweetheart Grandma" Helen Desha Beamer.
Length: 1:23

A te, e holo nei i ta pua`a
[grunt]
A te, inu i ta wai
[slurp]
A te, `ai ana ta pua`a, pöloli paha
[eat]
A te, i tu iluna ta pua`a, mömona teia ta pua`a
[slurp]
A te, e holo nei i ta pua`a
[grunt]
[Pua`a chaser: hele! hele!]


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