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Beamer comments on chant "Keawe `O`opa."
 Click to hear Audio transcript Click to see Video clip
Nona Beamer
Honolulu, 1999
In this clip, Auntie Nona tells of the chant "Keawe `O`opa" about the lame poet admirer of Princess Lili`uokalani, and when she first heard of it from her "Sweetheart Grandma" Helen Desha Beamer.
Length: 1:48

NONA BEAMER: There were so many Keawes. But Keawe `O`opa was the lame poet. That's why the word `o`opa, because he hobbled, you know, when he walked. And I'm not really clear that he was in love with Lili`uokalani when she was a princess. And he longed to be a sweetheart of hers, you know. But realizing that he wasn't a complete man, he couldn't profess his love to her, you know. But if he could be an eel, wrapped around the rock, he would look at her when she came to bathe, and his eyes would be on her every move. It's kind of exciting when you think of his poetic mind. Suggesting all these images, all speaking of love. That she-if she could see in his mind, there were mirrors. And all of them mirrored her. But alas, I am a lame man. And I creep away and disappear in the dust. [WHIMPERS]
So many chants had variance to it, you know. And when used for different occasions, the name of the main character would change. But the body of the chant would remain the same. M-hm. Very true. Interesting. Innovative minds, these ancient poets. [CHUCKLES] And beautiful poetry.

MAILE LOO: So how do you-what are your memories of-of hearing that story from Sweetheart Grandma?

NONA BEAMER: Well ... it was kind of a grown-up story. And hard as a teenager-'cause I think I was about fourteen or so.


Beamer and Loo perform a Hula `O`opa.
 Click to hear Audio transcript Click to see Video clip
THIS PERFORMANCE CLIP IS PROVIDED FOR RESEARCH PURPOSES ONLY AND IS NOT INTENDED TO SERVE AS AN INSTRUCTIONAL TOOL FOR ONE TO LEARN THE DANCE. PROPER PROTOCOL REQUIRES YOU SPEAK TO THE KUMU TO REQUEST PERMISSION.
Nona Beamer and Maile Loo
Honolulu, 1999
In this clip, Auntie Nona chants as hänai daughter Maile Loo shares a Hula `O`opa (dance as lame person) that she taught her. Chant is "Keawe `O`opa" or "Halehale Kealoha i Ha`ikü E."
Length: 1:39

`Ae, Halehale ke aloha i Ha`ikü e

Halehale ke aloha i Ha`ikü e
Aniani mai ana kona aloha
Ma luna mai a`o `Äwili kü
Ke po`i a ke kai a`o Kapeku
Kai `au`au ka mea aloha
Kona aloha ka walawala
`Oni ana ka Manawa me puhi ala
Huhululu i ka hulu o ka manu
Ka ua pëhia mai i ka pali
Keawe, Keawe, Keawe `O`opa
Ne`ene`e nei ma kahakai
O honua nalu `o Kamaka`eha
"A pae `o Kamaka`eha i ka nalu"
"A pae, a pae"
"A pae `o Kamaka`eha i ka nalu la"
"A pae?"


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